Species of the Month - August 2014

Pale Butterwort

Pinguicula lusitanica


Smaller than the Common Butterwort and flowering much later, with paler flowers and darker leaves, the Pale Butterwort is a widespread but elusive plant of boggy ground and wet flushes on peaty soils.
 

Pinguicula lusitanica   Pinguicula lusitanica

Like the Common Butterwort it feeds on insects trapped by its sticky leaves.  It flowers between July and October, but the leaves last through the winter, long after the flowers have gone, though in our climate they are not likely to trap many insects during the winter.

It is a member of the Oceanic Temperate element in our flora, having a coastal distribution from North-west Morocco up the west coasts of Portugal, Spain, France, Cornwall, Ireland and Scotland to Orkney.
 

Pinguicula lusitanica  

Pinguicula lusitanica

The stem and calyx are red and the outside of the flower has red streaks.  The leaves often have red veins.  The flower is about 6-8 mm across.
 

Pinguicula lusitanica

Pinguicula lusitanica
 

Pinguicula lusitanica
The rosette of sticky leaves that trap insects
on which the plant feeds


Please send in yo
ur Pale Butterwort sightings using the form below, or email sightings@lnhg.org.uk with the details if you prefer.  If you are not sure of the identity of your plant, please send a photo to sightings@lnhg.org.uk, or put one on the LORN forum and let me know it is there.
 

Date of sighting 
Location 
Grid reference 
Number seen 
Name of finder 
Your name (if different) 
Email (not needed if I already know it!) 
Any other details, e.g. habitat,
whether flowering, etc
   


 

By filling in this form you consent to your record being passed on to the appropriate recording scheme.  Your email address will not form part of the record and will not be passed on to anyone.

Carl Farmer
LNH
G Biological Records Manager
 


Note you can still send in records for past species of the month.  Here is the list of species we've had so far:


Jul 2014 - Melancholy Thistle
Jun 2014 - Forester Moth
May 2014 - Large Red Damselfly

Apr 2014 - Hedgehog
Mar 2014 - Hairy Bittercress
Feb 2014 - Pale Brindled Beauty
Jan 2014 - Velvet Shank
Dec 2013 - Frilly-fruited Jelly Lichen
Nov 2013 - Whooper Swan
Oct 2013 - Ballerina Waxcap
Sep 2013 - Parrot Waxcap
Aug 2013 - Vapourer Moth

Jul 2013 - Emerald Damselfly
Jun 2013 - Globe Flower
May 2013 - Early Purple Orchid
Apr 2013 - Peacock Butterfly
Mar 2013 - Oak Beauty
Feb 2013 - Coral Lungwort

Jan 2013 - Willow Jelly Button & Birch Jelly Button
Dec 2012 - Dice Lichen
Nov 2012 - Feathered Thorn
Oct 2012 - Dryad's Saddle
Sep 2012 - Tawny Grisette
Aug 2012 - Forest Bug
Jul 2012 - Grayling
Jun 2012 - Greater and Lesser Butterfly Orchids
May 2012 - Small Copper
Apr 2012 - Green Tiger Beetle
Mar 2012 - March Moth
Feb 2012 - Barren Strawberry
Jan 2012 - Brambling
Dec 2011 - Red Squirrel
Nov 2011 - Hazel Gloves
Oct 2011 - Small Tortoiseshell
Sep 2011 - Fly Agaric
Aug 2011 - Grass of Parnassus
Jul 2011 - Golden-ringed Dragonfly
Jun 2011 - 7-spot Ladybird
May 2011 - Green Hairstreak
Apr 2011 - Townhall Clock

Mar 2011 - Frogspawn

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This project is supported by Scottish Natural Heritage



All photos and other content copyright Carl Farmer except where stated